Homemade furikake no. 4: Spicy curry peanut

furikake4_currypn450.jpg

Warning: This furikake is very dangerous. It is so more-ish that you might find yourself putting spoonfuls of it directly in your mouth. To prevent this, I recommend making it a tad spicier than you might be comfortable with eating it on its own, so it will not disappear before you can use it on your rice. The spicy-salty-sweet taste, coupled with the interesting textures of the peanuts and the seeds, is quite hard to resist.

It’s the least Japanese-tasting furikake so far perhaps, but it fits plain white or brown rice very well. It is not exactly low-calorie, but a tablespoon or so goes quite a long way to spice up things.

All the spices can be found at an Indian or South Asian grocery store.

Spicy curry peanut furikake

  • 1 cup (240ml) roasted shelled peanuts, unsalted is preferred but salted is ok
  • 2 tsp. vegetable oil (light olive oil, peanut oil, canola oil, etc)
  • 1 Tbs. kalonji seeds (also known as black onion seeds or nigella seeds)
  • 1 Tbs. mustard seeds (brown or black; here I used brown)
  • 1 Tbs. brown sugar
  • 1 Tbs. curry powder
  • 2 tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1/4 tsp. hot chili powder (more or less to taste)
  • 2 tsp. soy sauce
  • salt if needed

Equipment suggested: food processor, frying pan

Heat up the frying pan over medium-low heat.

Chop the peanuts up roughly in the food processor - don’t turn it into a powder. (You can also do this by hand.)

Put the oil and peanuts in the frying pan; toss for a few minutes until it starts to smell a bit toasty. Add the seeds, sugar and dry spices; stir around to release the oils in the spices. Do not let it burn or it will taste bitter.

Add the soy sauce to the hot pan - it will sizzle. Stir around until the moisture has evaporated.

Take off the heat, and immediately empty out into a bowl or something - if you leave it in the hot pan it will continue to cook and may burn! Let cool.

Taste, and add salt if you think it needs it.

Makes about 1 cup. Store well covered. It doesn’t need to be refrigerated. It rarely lasts more than a few days in our house so I’m not sure how long it will keep though.

Notes

I’ve used a premixed curry powder here (which I buy at a multi-ethnic grocery store in Zürich), plus turmeric to give a color boost. If you know how to mix your own curry powder by all means do so. Here is a formula used by a Japanese spice company.

Kalonji seeds, often seen as naan bread topping, are the black seeds from the nigella sativa plant, which is known as Love-In-A-Mist. They make gorgeous dried flowers. It seems the ‘black onion seed’ name is a misnomer, and I’m not sure I detect any onion flavor. But they are very tasty and I love them on a lot of things.

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Spicy curry peanut furikake

Hi M,

The word spicy and curry stops me in my tracks. I did not know that Japanese food had curry dishes as well as spicy. Horse radish is spicy, but when I think of curry I relate to South East Asian curry which is one of the spicy regions I’ve ventured to.

This dish sounds so yummy, I am going to go to the local supermercado just to pick up some peanuts and Japanese brown or white rice.

Thank you.

Ciao from South America

O

Actually, spicy curry is

Actually, spicy curry is extremely popular in Japan. There is one chain of curry restaurants where the spice level is measured in numbers, similar to the “star” system used by a lot of Thai and Indian places. If you want to order the 5-star you must have employee approval, which is given in the form of a card that is marked when you’ve sucessfully finished a 4-star order. The spice level goes to 10, and you have to successfully (as in eat the whole thing without dying) complete each level before you are allowed to move to the next one. I regularly order 5-star curry dishes just about everywhere I go. I LOVE spicy food. I ordered the level 3 curry at that restaurant and it was almost too spicy for me. My husband made it to 6 and was in bed for days with the worst tomach ache ever. If you finish the 10-star you get a special curry spoon. Probably not worth death by curry, but whatever. :P

Re: Actually, spicy curry is

My husband and I love Coco Ichiban! He ate Level 6 and it was a bit too much even for him. I stick to 3 there.

Re: Actually, spicy curry is

anon. wrote:

Actually, spicy curry is extremely popular in Japan. There is one chain of curry restaurants where the spice level is measured in numbers, similar to the "star" system used by a lot of Thai and Indian places. If you want to order the 5-star you must have employee approval, which is given in the form of a card that is marked when you've sucessfully finished a 4-star order. The spice level goes to 10, and you have to successfully (as in eat the whole thing without dying) complete each level before you are allowed to move to the next one. I regularly order 5-star curry dishes just about everywhere I go. I LOVE spicy food. I ordered the level 3 curry at that restaurant and it was almost too spicy for me. My husband made it to 6 and was in bed for days with the worst tomach ache ever. If you finish the 10-star you get a special curry spoon. Probably not worth death by curry, but whatever. :P

If you are referring to Coco Ichiban, I don't think it can compare to Indian and Thai heat. I only order the 10 from there, and still add a good couple of teaspoons of Blair's After Death sauce or a few tablespoons of Tabasco with a fair coating of shichimi togarashi. Thai restaurants in Kansai, even when asked to give 'real Thai style hot' levels of spice to curries, tend to be pale to what is available in Thailand. Never having been to India I can only imagine the same holds true for Indian curries in Japan. And 'Japanese' curry is just a sweetened imitation... :P

Re: Actually, spicy curry is

There's nothing necessarily "imitation" about the curry frequently served in Japan, it's not the same as Thai curry for sure but get over yourself. Way to be a prick on this lovey website of fabulous recipes and food preparation tips!

Could this double as Indian Chex Mix?

I tried out this recipe last night, just one substitution, minced dried onion for the black onion seeds. It turned out wonderful and delicious! A very addictive flavor. Although cause I was so worried about chopping my peanuts too fine, some of them actually did not get chopped at all!

Also I think after testing this recipe on several people, I am going to use this spice combo to make a Indian Chex Mix! Pretty much thinking about doubling the recipe and then adding chex to it, and cooking in the oven for a while. I have high hopes, but I do not know if that will actually make it to my bento when I do try it.

Thanks for the recipe!

Wow!

This has an amazingly intense flavor! The seeds just burst in your mouth! How’d you formulate this recipe? It’d be awesome to know your “creative process” so that we can apply something similar ourselves. I haven’t tried this on rice yet, just ate a small spoonful from the pan… I can’t wait for lunch today! :D

Chex Mix!!! What a fab idea~

Even with some ingredient modification, this is super tasty~
I really like Teeny's idea of using it to make a chex mix.

Limited Pantry, but Still Tasty!

This was my first furikake I ever made! I didn't have the mustard seeds or onion seeds, but I'm crazy about curry so I just subsituted black sesame seeds for texture. I wound up grinding the peaunuts down a little too much, but it turned out really tasty anyways! I took your advice and made it a little spicier with some cayenne pepper so I wouldn't just dump it all down my pie hole in one shot! Thanks so much for the recipe, your site is very inspirational =)

Re: Homemade furikake no. 4: Spicy curry peanut

Just tried making this tonight and it is delicious! I couldn't keep myself from eating a tiny spoonful once or twice while it was cooling down. My husband loves curry and spice and I am actually afraid to leave him alone in the house with this tomorrow while I am at work, for fear he will eat it all while I am out! Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I hope you are feeling well today.

Re: Homemade furikake no. 4: Spicy curry peanut

Hi! Can I substitute onion flakes for nigella? I cant find them anywhere. If not onion flakes, what is a good substitute.

thanks!

Re: Homemade furikake no. 4: Spicy curry peanut

I might try a mixture of onion flakes and poppy seeds as a substitute here. Replacing the whole amount of nigella seeds with onion flakes would make the onion flavor too overwhelming probably.

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