miso furikake?

rehfilet
Bento-ing from: › Germany
Joined: 11 Aug 2009
User offline. Last seen 3 years 6 weeks ago.

i love the taste of miso- is there a way to make miso-tasting, miso-containing furikake?

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Loretta
Moderator
Bento-ing from: London › UK
Joined: 4 Mar 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 7 weeks ago.
Re: miso furikake?

Rice bran is not exactly a 'tasty' food. It's mostly seen as a waste product that's left when brown rice is milled to make it into shiny white pearls.

On the other hand it is really, really good for you so there are lots of attempts to incorporate it back into people's diets.
People who do baking might add it to muffins and other breads and cakes (I like to add a spoonful or so to the bread machine) You'll also find it as an ingredient in breakfast cereals and the like.

Rice bran is used quite a bit in Japan for making pickles and it has other culinary uses too, but actually 'eating' it doesn't seem to be that common. Nevertheless, it is cheap in Japan and easily available there (some of the smaller speciality rice shops will even give you some for free if you ask nicely). You can also find cheap bags of nuka in Japanese shops here in Europe, although often these bags may have other ingredients, like chili, for easy pickle making, so best to check.

But my suggestion would be to look in health food shops in your local area (I think rice bran is reiskleie in German). It is quite a widely available ingredient and very inexpensive.

Perhaps there are other brans or cereals you could use instead of reiskleie? Sesame alone wouldn't be enough to bind the miso into a dry furikake, it's the bran that gives it such an agreeable 'breadcrumb' texture, and as I said, rice bran is extremely nutritious. I'm really happy you've helped me find this extra use for it!

If you find you can't eat it all, then you can use it in this alternative way (the reason I always have some around). Nuka is also a traditional Japanese beauty ingredient. Pop some it into a clean but old sock, tie up the sock and take it to the shower or bath with you. Once the nuka sock is wet it will start to leak rice bran 'milk' and this is a really effective moisturiser. Basically, I use Marseilles soap first, then I scrub my body with nuka milk before rinsing off. I end up with much softer skin this way. The sock does need to be emptied out within a couple of days as the wet nuka will start to smell.
Here's an image of how it was used: http://www.printsofjapan.com/images/Kunisada_nuka_bukuro7.jpg
(This is the second time I've found myself discussing the benefits of washing your body with nuka today!)

BACK AGAIN WITH A FOLLOW UP REPORT:
I tried it on the in-house guineapig later that day. I gave him a tiny bowl of rice with the miso/bran/sesame mixture to see what he thought of it. It was all a bit out of the blue for him, but after a couple of bites he warmed to it and ended up making himself up seconds, and even thirds. He said he couldn't actually taste the rice bran at all, and would never have known it was there, but the sesame flavour did come through. Eating it wasn't hugely different from stirring miso into hot rice (something he likes to do occasionally) but he appreciated that this 'furikake' was potentially more convenient and the addition of nuka was seen as a valuable enhancement.
Personally I wouldn't add mirin to this. I find that miso (certainly the miso we use) has an inherent sweetness to it, despite the saltiness. So it isn't something I myself would add.

WITH GINGER:
For my taste, this is a huge improvement and elevates the 'furikake' from being something that's much like a dry textured fresh miso substitute into a more 'interesting' rice topping. It should be warned here that just a little grated ginger goes a VERY long way.
Once I added the ginger (which I grated as finely as possible and quickly sauteed in a drop of sesame oil to 'dry it out' - just a bit - then added the remaining miso mixture and stirred through very quickly) the miso taste was noticeably less pronounced. It could be that you won't like it this way so much, rehfilet, but for me the 'furikake' now has an added 'sparkle' and the taste seems more complex. You can probably guess by now that I'm very, very happy that your post urged me to discover this recipe. I'm more curious than ever to try it with dulse flakes, but next time round I might try experimenting with a touch of finely grated fried garlic.
I've got a hunch that this ginger/miso/bran/sesame furikake will be really nice sprinkled onto grated raw carrot, something else I'll be trying this weekend.

Loretta
Moderator
Bento-ing from: London › UK
Joined: 4 Mar 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 7 weeks ago.
Re: miso furikake?

I liked the sound of this too, so I tried an experiment this afternoon.

I took my cue from this recipe
http://knachu.exblog.jp/7043600/
and ran it through a translation engine
http://www.excite-webtl.jp/world/english/web/?wb_url=http%3A%2F%2Fknachu...
I didn't have the dulse (and I'd run out of ginger) but I did have everything else. This is what I did.

Ingredients:
rice bran (nuka)
sesame seeds
miso
sesame oil

First I added a small measure of rice bran to a pan on a medium/low heat and 'dry roasted' it for a while, stirring often so that it didn't burn or scorch. The rice bran was removed and set aside.
Into the pan I added the same small measure of sesame seeds until they were very lightly toasted and fragrant. Again, these were removed.

I then put equal parts of:
the toasted rice bran
the toasted sesame seeds
and the same small measure of red miso (aka miso)
into a pestle and mortar and combined the ingredients (the pestle and mortar isn't required at all if you are using pre-toasted sesame seeds that have already been flaked or ground).
The mixture was stirred and separated with a fork and then added to the hot pan on a low heat, I added a dribble of sesame oil and stirred through.

I've made it twice now (first time to try it, second time to store some) turned out to be a suprisingly tasty mixture that looks just like a furikake. If I'd had any ginger I would have grated some and stirred it through at the very end, just after adding the sesame oil. I'm curious to know what it's like with flakes of Dulse mixed through.

It's very easy to do and it's really nice with rice!
Thank you very much for the inspiration, rehfilet!

rehfilet
Bento-ing from: › Germany
Joined: 11 Aug 2009
User offline. Last seen 3 years 6 weeks ago.
Re: miso furikake?

thank you very much for your quick answer! that's very similar to what i had in mind- sesame is allways good. i was thinking, maybe a little mirin for a touch of sweetness?
i don't know if i can get a hold of any rice bran and i'd be kind of reluctant to buy it because i've never tasted it- what's it like? i imagine it's rather mild? i'd put something mild in my dream miso furikake, because i want to taste the miso.
i love the idea of using vegetables in furikake. i think i'd try carrots, because they are in the fridge. any other suggestions?

rehfilet
Bento-ing from: › Germany
Joined: 11 Aug 2009
User offline. Last seen 3 years 6 weeks ago.
Re: miso furikake?

ah, i know bran in general- i thought mayby some fermented kind was used in this recipe.
i was thinking about using carrots as a base for the furikake, like in maki's "homemade furikake nr.2", but i was hungry and ate them.. now i have none for experimenting tonight.
if i do make a carrot version i'll be sure to post about it. probably with only very little mirin, as carrots are sweet.
hmmm. ginger is allways good, especially with carrots, but it's not what i had in mind here. i have to restrict my use of ginger a little or i'll end up putting it into everything i eat.
i'd definitely put in some grated citrus peel and a hint of juice for a fresh taste. no chance of getting yuzu, something else, lemon or lime i guess, will have to do.

Loretta
Moderator
Bento-ing from: London › UK
Joined: 4 Mar 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 7 weeks ago.
Re: miso furikake?

I looked at Maki's "furikake no.2" also and thought it might be nice to just combine that furikake with the miso/bran/sesame furikake (with or without ginger).

I've completely wowed my husband today by combining the miso/bran/sesame/ginger mix with a furikake recipe I make often where I gently dry out flaked tinned mackerel in a pan then combine it with equal measures of soy sauce and mirin (I usually add some sesame seeds to this too, but, obviously, this wasn't required as the miso mixture already had plenty).

Mixed together the two kinds of furikake became a 'super' furikake (I was inspired by Maki's mother's saba no miso ni recipe which seems to have all the same flavours). This was a tremendous success at my house, probably my favourite furikake so far, especially as all the ingredients are staple ones we always have to hand and inexpensive too. So I've now concluded my experiments and have two (or rather three) new miso furikake recipes in the bag!

I look forward to finding out about yours. And I agree with you, if you're looking to pursue a 'pure' miso flavour, the ginger really doesn't take the recipe into that direction (but it is very nice!)

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