Drinks question!

Aleria
Bento-ing from: Vancouver › British Columbia › Canada
Joined: 20 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 37 weeks ago.

Well, the weather's been warming up lately, and drinking hot tea is going to start to be not so nice soon. While I do make plain iced tea, both green and black, I've been enjoying cold milk tea lately. I usually make it the night before, let it cool in the fridge and then drink it in the next couple days.
It'd be nice to make it in advance and be able to store it for, say, a week or so.
But for some reason, I think that when you heat the milk up, it'll make it spoil faster. I don't know why I think this, and I'm not sure if it's right or not.
If it is, could it be avoided by making the milk tea with milk powder instead?

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bronwyncarlisle
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Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 20 weeks ago.
Re: Drinks question!

When you heat milk up it will not make it spoil faster. Pasteurisation is heating milk up, and that makes it keep for longer. Specifically, heating milk (or anything else for that matter) to 72°C for, I think it's only 3 seconds or so, will kill most (99.999% or something like that) of the spoilage bacteria. Heating it to 55°C for a couple of hours will do the same thing; this is how you pasteurise eggs without cooking them. You DO need to cool it rapidly after it's been heated though - it needs to get through the warm 55°C - 4°C (fridge temp) phase as quickly as possible, because that the range at which the few bacteria left in it will multiply.

So to your tea. I'm not sure exactly what milk tea is - I can't stand anything more than the faintest drip of milk in my tea, and I find hot tea quite refreshing in the heat! But presumably you brew it the same as hot tea, but maybe in milk? (That sounds ghastly to me.) You can brew it as long as you like at more than 55°C - tea usually wants to be a lot hotter than that to extract the goodies from the leaves anyway - but once it gets below 55°C cool it fast. Putting the container in a sink or whatever of iced water will do that much faster than putting it in the fridge, because water is a much better conductor of heat than air is.

Milk made with milk powder is just the same (as far as bacteria go, I hate the taste of it) as ordinary milk. What you COULD do is make a batch of tea with water, and then add the appropriate amount of milk powder when it's cold. Or you could store your cold tea and add the milk powder just before you drink it - the same way you add sugar to hot tea.

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Bronwyn

My blog is Food and Shoes

Aleria
Bento-ing from: Vancouver › British Columbia › Canada
Joined: 20 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 37 weeks ago.
Re: Drinks question!

Thanks for the ideas! I'm not sure about normal milk tea, but when I make it I usually brew the tea in water and add lots of milk afterwards. The idea of adding milk powder after sounds nice, though. It would probably dilute the taste less. I'll be doing some experimenting this summer, hehe.

Loretta
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Bento-ing from: London › UK
Joined: 4 Mar 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 4 days ago.
Re: Drinks question!

Like Bronwyn, I'm rarely keen to have anything more than a tiny dash of milk in a black tea and then I can't bear to drink this when it gets cold as a film forms on it.

But there are lots of different ways of making milk tea and I have enjoyed icy cold tea made with milk in cafes and restaurants. One of my favourites was cold milky and gorgeously smoky, I really should figure out how to replicate it.

Royal Milk Tea is available in pretty much every vending machine in Japan. People drink this hot and cold. Unfortunately I don't really know how to make it, from what I understand, you heat together milk and water (50% each) and brew tea in it.

The way I do know how to brew milk tea is just with milk. Heat milk in a pan to 45C (113F), add loose leaf black tea of your choice and infuse to taste - making sure the milk never heats up beyond 75C (167F). Once you're happy with the strength of the brew, remove from the heat and strain. If I was going to keep it for longer than a day I might freeze rather than have it in the fridge (I'm squeamish about powdered milk, the only use I have for it is making bread).
I guess I have a prejudice about keeping brewed tea as it oxidises, so I would be more concerned about the deteriorating taste of the tea itself than I would be about milk spoiling. Even cold lemon tea doesn't taste so nice to me after a full day in the chiller.

The latest way I've discovered to enjoy cold tea involves adding a couple of teaspoons of loose leaf tea to a bottle of sparkling water. I then very carefully tip the bottle upside down to distribute the leaves through the water and leave it in the refrigerator overnight. Next day, strain as you pour it. Made with Jasmine tea it's delicious! But you do need to take a lot of care opening the bottle - I recommend wrapping a tea towel around the top as a protective measure.

bronwyncarlisle
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Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 20 weeks ago.
Re: Drinks question!

We must be tea twins.

If it's smoky it must be Lapsang Souchong, no? I'm a railway (gumboot) tea addict myself, usually, that is, Lately I've sort of given it up and am drinking water. Something to do with menopause and weird bladder things. I think, anyway.

The only time I use powdered milk myself is for yoghurt. To make it thicker. I'm quite sure that my aversion to powdered milk is psychological and has to do with school milk when I was small. Not that that was powdered, but it was disgusting, so anything but the freshest coldest milk still seems highly suspect to me. I am probably rambling, having just got home from a 120th wedding anniversary. That's three couples @ 40 years each. A bit of an achievement you have to admit. And somewhat alcoholic (and cake-oholic).

Whatever, I should go to bed. Good night,

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