I need your help!

maki
admin
Bento-ing from: somewhere › France
Joined: 24 Jan 2007
User offline. Last seen 3 weeks 2 days ago.

Hi! If you have a digital metric/ounces scale, measuring cups, rice cooker and Japanese rice…I need your help!

I’m working on the second draft of The Cookbook at the moment, which is where we fix things like accurate measurements. However, I’m on the road and dont have access to a kitchen. So, I need your help with something!

If you have a digital metric/ounces scale, measuring cups, rice cooker and Japanese style (Japonica, sushi) rice - can you take a few moments and do this:

  • Measure out 1 rice cooker cup of Japanese rice and see how many mililiters that is (it should be 180ml)
  • Now, weigh that rice with a digital scale and tell me how many grams and ounces that is
  • Bonus: Measure 1 U.S. cup (which is about 240ml) and tell me how much that weighs in grams and ounces
  • (and only if you are curious) - See if 1 rice cooker cup of another rice, say basmati, arborio, jasmine, etc…weighs the same as Japanese rice!

Please report back your results in the comments here! I really appreciate it!!

____________________________________

The Big Onigiri.

- Wherever you go, there you are. -

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
jens persson
Re: I need your help!

Go metric, go go go

:-)

greetings from Sweden where everything is metric (accept for food energy content that tend to be double marked in kilocalories and kilojoule), much simpler.

Stephanie
Bento-ing from: San Lorenzo › California › USA
Joined: 15 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 4 years 6 weeks ago.
Re: I need your help!

I checked my measuring cups at home because it did seem odd to me that there were so many different variations and I have several different measurements for cups (US), ranging from 180 ml for my rice cooker to 237 and 250 ml for my measuring cup sets. And I did some further checking, it looks like the standard US cup is 237 ml. I also found this site might make conversions a bit easier.

http://www.onlineconversion.com/cooking.htm

If it is really a concern you might make a note to use the same set when making one dish, so at least the measurements are consistent.

bronwyncarlisle
Moderator
Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 19 weeks ago.
Re: I need your help!

And New Zealand, and just about everywhere else - I think it's just America that goes for cups. Problem is, it's such a large market that a cookbook writer (especially one who's publishing IN America) needs to include cup measurements in the recipes.

I want to know how they measure pints of strawberries myself - I have visions of squashing strawberries into milk bottles, but I know that can't be right.

____________________________________

Bronwyn

My blog is Food and Shoes

maki
admin
Bento-ing from: somewhere › France
Joined: 24 Jan 2007
User offline. Last seen 3 weeks 2 days ago.
Re: I need your help!

Yeah, the book will have both U.S. cups and metric measurements. I was just wondering whether the metric should be both ml and grams, or just ml, or just grams. So much to think about, when it's going to be printed on dead trees vs. always-editable-electronic form!

bronwyncarlisle
Moderator
Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 19 weeks ago.
Re: I need your help!

Well, speaking with my scientist hat on, ml for liquids and g for solids. Depending on the shape of the solids the same volume can contain different weights. For example: 200 ml of sugar cubes will weigh considerably less than 200ml of granular sugar, because much more space is taken up by the air between the cubes. This is not an issue with liquids, which is why we have weight and volume measurements in the first place.

Cookbooks here usually have grams and cups for things like flour, and millilitres and cups for things like milk.

Jiza
Bento-ing from: Madrid › Spain
Joined: 13 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 36 weeks ago.
Re: I need your help!

The only thing whose mls are equivalent to its grs is water, which means a glass containing 200 ml of water will wheigh 200 gr.
For the vast rest of things you'll need to measure both in grs and ml.

____________________________________

My bento blog: http://justbento.com/blog/1305
My art blog: http://jizaacaso.deviantart.com

awo
Re: I need your help!

rice cooker cup which says 180ml
white Japanese rice = 163g (although it's 新米, if that makes a difference)
brown Japanese rice - 157g (not 新米)

American measuring cup which says 235ml (although google says 236.6)
white Japanese rice: 222
brown Japanese rice: 198

No ounces on my scale - sorry!

devilkitty
Ask and ye shall receive.

Mean of two measurements for each combination:

Rice cooker cups:
Japanese (semi-brown): 5.50 oz. / 156 gm.
Basmati: 5.30 oz. / 150 gm.

US dry cups:
Japanese (semi-brown): 7.33 oz. / 208 gm.
Basmati: 6.91oz. / 197 gm.

adora
Re: I need your help!

I bought a new rice cooker 2 weeks ago, the fancy computing kind. It came with a slightly larger cups than normal. The cup says 180ml, but I measured it as 190ml. When I fill it with Japanese rice all the way to flush, it weights 160grams.

I think 1 US cup is 250ml (because 4 cups = 1 litre), 1 Japanese cup is 240ml. The 250ml cup of Japanese rice weights 200 grams. Jasimine Rice and Basmati Rice weights about the same! I hope this helps!

nickleplated
Re: I need your help!

The only way I had to measure the volume of my rice cooker cup was to fill it with water and weigh that.
Since 1 g of water = 1 mL, it's an easy conversion.
My Rice Cooker cup weighed ~180 g (180 mL)
My US cup weighed ~237 g ( 237 mL)

Select Kagayaki - California Premium Short Grain:
Rice Cooker cup - 5.71 oz. / 162 gm.
US cup - 7.94 oz. / 225 gm.

maki
admin
Bento-ing from: somewhere › France
Joined: 24 Jan 2007
User offline. Last seen 3 weeks 2 days ago.
Re: I need your help!

Holy cow, variations! Now my head hurts. Thanks everyone!! ^_^; (Off to ponder what measures to use)

Alice
Bento-ing from: Leicester › UK
Joined: 9 Jun 2008
User offline. Last seen 3 years 14 weeks ago.
Re: I need your help!

With alot of liquids, the difference is within the error on a pair of kitchen scales anyway.

Anna
Re: I need your help!

Hi Maki
I prefer both grams and ml in cookbooks for both liquids and solids. Not everyone has an accurate scale - if so, calculating the volume may be a bit painful (this happened to me when I was a student and didn't own a good Swiss kitchen scale yet). But with a good scale, measuring out large volumes by weight (eg, flour while baking) is much faster and easier than taking the time to measure the volume. Also, the maximum capacity of most volume measures is smaller than those of scales. Sorry, I need to go and check on my baking bread :D

Gen
Joined: 8 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 3 years 41 weeks ago.
Re: I need your help!

Hi Maki!

I recommend using ml for liquids and gr for solid things. That's the most commen thing here in Germany.

Have fun finishing your book!
Geni

bronwyncarlisle
Moderator
Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 19 weeks ago.
Re: I need your help!

You don't need to measure in both. You just don't measure liquids by weight, and you don't measure solids by volume (unless you are American). If you have 250g flour you have no need to know what its volume is in ml (in fact it varies, depending on how tightly it's packed). Likewise you don't need to know what 250ml of milk weighs. This is of course unless you only have measuring cups, in which case you use the American method anyway.

rehfilet
Bento-ing from: › Germany
Joined: 11 Aug 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 51 weeks ago.
Re: I need your help!

hello,
my rice cooker cup (180 ml) holds 162 g of white, short-grain rice.

i agree with the others- ml and l are for the volumes of liquids (because those are tightly packed without air pockets anyway); kg and g are weights for solid and dry stuff (like this, the merchant can't sell you air by not packing everything tightly).
the relations between the cubic systems are like this: if you imagine a cube of 10cm x 10cm x 10cm, you could fill it with 1 l (=1000 ml) of water which would weight 1 kg (=1000g). only works that easily with water, of course. (watery things (milk, broth) can still be measured-and-conversed that way, but it's no good for oils, honey and the like)

then again, while cooking, smaller amounts of anything are often given in "teaspoon" or "table spoon" measurements here in germany (and europe in general i guess). those mean actual cutlery spoons, not the bigger measuring spoons! that had me confused for some time when first working with internet recipes.

btw, how the vulture do you measure "4 cups of spinach"? i can push very much spinach into a measuring cup if i choose to! if i blanch it first, it will be even more..
there are lots of tender things i wouldn't want to crush by measuring them in little cups, too; and doesn't it take a lot of time to put everything into a cup if you have to feed more than one person? i can weight my veggies in the shop, my butcher weights meat for me. i take it home and put it in the dish i want to cook! ^^ ... unless i got the recipe out of the internet, which usually leaves me wondering about what size things need to be diced before i put them in the cup or what kind of teaspoon is meant this time.

i'm fond of my rice cooker cup, though. weighting rice would be unpractical, and it seems to be constantly 180 ml so far. hooray for the rice cooker cup!

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.

New forum activity since your last visit

TitleAuthorsort iconAnswersLast Post
Sesame salad dressing Supertaster946 weeks 6 days ago
Authentic paella? maki1048 weeks 16 hours ago
IMPORTANT: If you have a blog on JustBento... maki250 weeks 5 days ago
Shiso - uses for this herb Loretta01 year 4 days ago
Fuki (Japanese Butterbur) Tsukemono Recipes kumo51 year 5 days ago