How do you make old-school soba noodles?

オタク
Bento-ing from: › North Carolina › USA
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I have a gluten allergy. I adore soba. I have heard that in ye olden times, that you could make soba with buckwheat only, as opposed to adding wheat or other grains. I have plenty of buckwheat here, and my problems lay in cutting to the proper thickness and cooking them. I seem to cut them too thick, but any thinner and they crumble. Also boiling causes them to disintegrate, and steaming makes them gummy.

So, What am I doing wrong here?

PS: I also make my own Buckwheat flour. some is roasted and then it is all ground up together.

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bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

What exactly do you put in them? In addition to the buckwheat flour, that is.

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オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Just water and buckwheat. I read in a book that that was the way they were made prior to the introduction of wheat.

Loretta
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

It's not just in 'olden times'. Soba is still made with only soba flour and no wheat and you can buy it dried like this too.

It IS tricky to do by hand, but full instructions (with photos) are given in "The Book of Soba" by James Udesky. You can find a second hand copy through Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Book-Soba-James-Udesky/dp/4770019564
It's an excellent resource and highly recommended.

You can see some of the techniques involved for getting the glutenless soba flour to bind together on youtube.
I posted a link in this post: http://justbento.com/forum/adventures-udon-making#comment-7512
(I did go to the soba making class I mentioned but it was for beginners so I used the common 8 parts soba, 2 parts wheat ratio).
You can see the first part of a tutorial using only soba flour here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxv3KlhIY10

If you are looking for ready made dried soba without wheat, look for the characters そば粉100% on the package. This means that it is made with 100% soba flour. Usually it costs more than cheaper soba + wheat packets.

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

You are so knowledgeable Loretta! How do you do it? And have you had that baby yet? Would love to hear what sort and how heavy and all that.

Loretta
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Thanks Bronwyn! (reddens)

The Book of Soba I recommended is an excellent resource so that anyone who reads it can't help but appear knowledgeable.

Most of the restaurant recommendations for Tokyo are still in business 20 years after the book was published and visiting them does really help understand how different even the very best soba noodles can be.

Otaku, the way soba is milled will probably have an impact on the noodles. Most of the soba flour used for hand made 100% soba noodles is refined using only the inner parts of the seed. The most valued is flour using only the white endosperm and noodles made with this are called sarashina noodles. The darker part nearer the husk is more rarely used in the capital - although dark inaka (country) style soba noodles can be found in some specialist places and the buckwheat taste is more pronounced in these, I personally relish these. From what I remember about eating this style is that the noodles did seem shorter and more brittle but I may be imagining this.
I can't help but suspect that you will find it easier to make 100% soba noodles using the lighter grades (grades 1 & 2, perhaps even 3). There is a slightly coarser grade of soba flour called uchiko which is used to dust the surfaces and help prevent the dough and strands from sticking.
Merely grinding whole buckwheat might not be the optimum way (it's an easy seed to grind, I've done it in a pestle and mortar)
And, of course, the flour should be as fresh as possible.

Also, when cooking freshly made noodles you will need a LOT of boiling water. Cook the noodles for no more than 60 seconds and drain and dunk them immediately into ice cold water. You will need to be very careful how you do this - a thin mesh basket that can be drained of water and dunked into ice water so that you don't touch the noodles would be ideal.

As making 100% soba noodles is so notoriously tricky, you might like to try using a non gluten binder. If I was going to try making them without wheat I'd experiment first with adding grated and whipped nagaimo or yamaimo as well as hot water.

Best of luck!

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

A binder is what I was thinking ; undoubtedly non-traditional, but eggs might work too. Like a Breton galette, which I make with just buckwheat flour.

オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

The seeds I have here are a greenish to light tan color. It is organic and hulled, but grown by another farmer. packages of flour are prohibitively expensive, so I grind the seeds up in my blender after a light toast.

The other flours available to me are: potato starch, tapioca starch, Corn starch, corn meal, corn grits, corn polenta, blue corn meal, corn masa, mochi-mai rice flour, kinako, and teff flour. Which of these would you think would be good binders?(Cut and paste if you need to.)

Matt Cargo
Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Never tried making them myself, but we heard a lot about soba during our visit to Japan this summer: Our hosts said they had taken a soba-making class. The students' job was to laboriously stone grind the flour. Then, after the flour was suitably fine, the soba sensei, and only the soba sensei, was allowed to mix in the water.

We also learned about some of the regional variations. Soba made in Izumo is particularly well regarded, and has a very smooth texture, with well-defined edges.

Loretta
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Although I would usually toast buckwheat grouts before cooking with them, there's nothing that I remember about soba noodle making that indicated that you need to toast them before milling them - at the class I attended they had an industrial soba mill and I was shown the seeds at every level of flour production.
photos of the room here: http://www.edotokyosoba.co.jp/pc/equipment.html
I also got to see and feel all the different grades of flour. What I've milled with a pestle and mortar and what you will have milled with a blender is very crude in comparison to high grade (1,2 or 3) buckwheat flour.
Restaurants where they mill their own flour use a dedicated implement that looks like this: http://www.edotokyosoba.co.jp/pc/image/gc_gpe7Image20081026094527.jpg

Alas, my copy of the soba book is in storage, but the only suggestion I have for making a soba dish with such a crude home made flour is sobagaki 蕎麦がき. It's a sort of dumpling and is made by cooking soba flour and hot water together - kind of like a buckwheat polenta. Sorry I can't post a recipe for this.
EDIT: I found this youtube tutorial where 225g of soba flour is combined with 600ml of water. Sweet azuki beans are then spooned over the dumplings, the same kind as used for oshiruko.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwgICeOiYf0

That time I made my own soba flour, I did combine it with water and made some rudimentary noodles (which were indeed very fragile). Have to say they were pretty revolting which is why I can't be more encouraging with grouts that have been turned to flour in a blender. Mochi rice flour might possibly work, but it isn't something I'd try myself - those galettes or Russian blinis seem a much tastier way of using soba.

オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Revolting? I don't often hear that word, what do you mean by that?
Was it texture? Flavor? Color? Smell? Or some meaning that is in your dialect of English?

Loretta
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

My 'dialect' in English as spoken in England??? You cheeky monkey! ;D

For me:
Revolting = disagreeable taste, inedible, revolts the stomach so that you gag slightly.

It's been a while, but what I remember from my experiment was that the texture was slimy and the noodles lacked 'cohesion'. The soba taste was raw and unpleasant, a perfect example of why I usually toast the groats before using them (.

Don't get me wrong, I very much enjoy soba, but grinding my own in such a rudimentary manner did heighten my appreciation for the experts who select soba seeds and mill them into flour in the appropriate way.
For me it proved why it is that people train for years to become soba noodle masters (if I had just ground a few soba seeds together and produced edible, never mind delicious, noodles it would have been a real surprise, as well as making a mockery of the reputation soba noodles have for being tricky to make by hand).

There's an interesting thread here with details of others' experiences: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/324929
The poster with the handle "Kishari" described her attempt as tasting like 'raw dirt', that isn't far off from how I remember it.

オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Well, My noodles tasted fine, and they weren't slimy. Just too big and a little gummy. I found out that after steaming the 100% buckwheat soba, that you are supposed to rinse them off, and there is a cutting method used in one of those youtube videos that depicts a board laid on top as a guide for the knife when cutting. That way all my problems have now been solved. Thanks guys.

On the note of dialects of English: I speak a combination of Southron (Dixie) and South Western dialects of American English.

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

American English has considerably fewer words in it than English English, although I didn't realise that revolting was one of them. Ask where the queue for something is and you'll be faced with a blank stare. They call it a line. An American Professor in our Department was puzzled by "crèche". I suppose that the ubiquity of American TV programmes and movies means that we all understand American English, but seeing as the Americans always rewrite UK TV programmes, removing all subtlety and translating to US English so Americans will understand them, Americans are not exposed to English English so much. I always think that's odd - someone up there who makes these decisions has either a very low opinion of the intelligence of Americans (after all, every 4 year old in the rest of the English speaking world understands American English perfectly well), or else there is a deliberate policy of cultural isolationism.

オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?
bronwyncarlisle wrote:

American English has considerably fewer words in it than English English, although I didn't realise that revolting was one of them. Ask where the queue for something is and you'll be faced with a blank stare. They call it a line. An American Professor in our Department was puzzled by "crèche". I suppose that the ubiquity of American TV programmes and movies means that we all understand American English, but seeing as the Americans always rewrite UK TV programmes, removing all subtlety and translating to US English so Americans will understand them, Americans are not exposed to English English so much. I always think that's odd - someone up there who makes these decisions has either a very low opinion of the intelligence of Americans (after all, every 4 year old in the rest of the English speaking world understands American English perfectly well), or else there is a deliberate policy of cultural isolationism.

Those at the top do have a low opinion of the general public. And there is a degree of cultural isolationism. My family first came here to get away from the British Government, so it makes some sense that they would want to be different in language and culture. The first of my european ancestors came here in 1620, and started the Plymouth Colony.

About our culture though, what most foreigners see is not our ethnic culture, but rather an industrial and city culture which has spread around the world like a plague. Our cultures (it is a big country), are all rather rich and all quite different from what you'd find elsewhere. To name a few: Cajuns, Creoles, Rednecks, Hillbillies, Oakies, Mid-westerners, Southern Californians, Chicanos, New Englanders, and numerous Native American Nations... Those are just a few.

They each have their own Dialect of English. If I were typing in any one of half of those you'd not understand what I was trying to convey. 'Stead o' th' other way 'round. Our people 'ave wanted to be different e'er since April 19, 1775. We seem to be almost to the point where we are going to have another Lexington And Concord. What will be the tipping point this time? Who knows. We are once again at the threshold of civil war.

Oh geez, this has gotten OT.

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

We see quite a bit of many of those different cultures in books and film and music though. There's more diversity in books and music perhaps than in film - I betcha I've read a gazillion times as many books about, or set around, Native American culture than you have New Zealand. There are just many many more of them. I'm a bit of a Tony Hillerman fan, so there are at least 10 straight off.
Anyway, the differences I was talking about are between standard American English (as heard on TV) and standard English English as spoken and understood by the English, the Scots, the Welsh, the Irish, South Africans, Australians, New Zealanders etc etc. Not the regional or ethnic dialects (or indeed languages) that exist in each of those places. Part of the difference has to be because America was the earliest of the colonies, so there's been a lot of time (and will) to grow apart, but I think most of it is because we see and hear heaps your music, books, TV, and film, but you don't see much of ours.

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

You are a very unusual American! Mind you I had already realised that when I saw you knew our distilled alcohol laws. How come you decided not to move?

オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

I have family in NZ and have looked into moving there myself. I read alot about your country while considering that possibility. I looked into your likker laws, your available property costs, taxes, gun laws, scenery, and the Maori.
I have a very old book called Maoridom, which is a family heirloom. It was brought here in the early 1900's by a family member who had settled there, and was here to visit his relations. Oh, and I want to try Zorbing.

c-helle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Hmm. While not an extremely common word, creche is not a nonexistent word in Am. English. I personally use the word at least once a year. And I don't think it's simply a matter of having fewer words; the same language would naturally evolve differently in different cultures.

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

You are quite right, languages do evolve differently in different cultures, but only when there is not a continual exchange of - what would you call it - when you hear other people talking and pick up their words? The rest of the English speaking world is always hearing and adopting (or at least understanding) American language via TV, music, film etc., but it doesn't work the other way around. Partly this is because there is just so much in the way of American stuff out there of course, but only partly.

Stephanie
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

I can quite assure you revolting is used in American English. Although I must also say that the majority of Americans have a very limited vocabulary, which may be why one would think that we have less words than other English spoken. I think that is a larger symptom of a problem in our society that we only need to know what we are interested, like my roommates in college not knowing what continent surrounded the South Pole and not being at all embarrassed by not knowing such a basic thing.

オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Your country has rather restrictive gun laws. And I don't have the money anymore because I lost my job and had to use up my savings on food. Our economy is much much worse in reality than our government and the media claim.

I was originally looking into your country as a place to flee to. Things are rarely what they seem. Here there is growing civil unrest, a worsening economy, ever more brutal cops, and the gov is also growing more and more totalitarian. I just want to live somewhere where they'll all just leave me alone. Here the new president said he was okay with us having hunting guns, but that he didn't have to sell us ammo. What a moron. Hunting is the third reason for having a gun. The first is laid down by the founders of this nation as a means to throw off oppression, the second is self defense, then hunting. He went and pissed off the silent majority. Every time they pass a new gun law here, most ignore it. And if the feds do any number of things, this powder keg will go off, and I didn't want to be here for it. Seeing now as how I can't avoid being here for it, I'm getting a better gun. A Mosin Nagant M91/30, which I'll be converting to a Finnish sniper rifle. I'm far and away not the only one who is trying to protect what he loves with the aid of gunpowder and lead. As I have said in the past, I will never start a fight, but god help the bastard that does.

There is a saying here, "When freedom becomes oppression, gun owners still get to vote".

We don't want to fight a civil war here, but the people in power keep pushing the general population into a corner, and when we bump into the wall, there will be blood. The most likely scenario is that the feds pass another stupid law and decide to enforce it. They then pick the wrong guy to make an example of, and we have another Waco or Ruby Ridge massacre, at which point, there will be a rebellion. It doesn't seem to be far off as some say they can feel the tension building up. It could start up if they pass the "Cap and Trade bill", or the "Health care reform", or all the new taxes they are trying to. The worst possible thing they could do is try to take the guns. They'd all be pushing up daisies in no time at all. Such is the state of things here. Our rebellion against Britain was fought by 3 percent and supported by 33 percent. A new poll has found that 56 percent of the population hates the federal government, and that about 10 percent are militia members.

That said, you can see why I considered moving there.

PS: Please pray for the folks up in Samoa, I have a friend in Pago-Pago who I haven't been able to get a hold of.

PPS: Won't Maki be upset that we ain't talking about food?

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Can't see why you'd consider moving here at all, actually. We already have much stronger versions of the laws you want to escape from, and we are very happy with it. You have no idea how pleasant it is to not have to worry about whether you can afford to be sick (costs $25 to visit the doctor and you just go whenever you want to, $3 per prescription, and nothing at all for hospital. And yes you can have insurance and go private if you want to), and not to have cops with guns because the criminals don't have guns either. Plenty of people hunt, however, they're just not allowed to use pistols or automatic weapons.

I don't pray for people, because I'm not religious, but I've been thinking good wishes for Samoa all day.

Shouldn't imagine Maki'd mind the non-food thing. There is another thread on line-drying laundry! But best not continue this topic I think, it's likely to be rather inflammatory. I rather suspect that you might be the only person in this community who'd think a gun compartment would be a useful addition to his bento box.

Tanuki
Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Sometimes grocers will have a roman transliteration on their dried noodle packages that say Jyuwari(juwari) or Towari Soba. It will make the 100% buckwheat soba easier to find. There may be a cross-contamination risk with wheat in the facilities that make these however. It's @ your own risk.

About a year ago I stumbled on another blog about a soba noodles class; sounds similar to the one you mention below, Loretta http://fxcuisine.com/default.asp?Display=38&resolution=high

Also I ran across a UK outfit that appears to make a number of gluten free noodles with buckwheat and various blends http://www.kingsoba.com/ -have you seen anyplace in your travels that carries these? They sound rather appealing.

c-helle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

I do know that there is a certain isolationism in America, but I've always enjoyed art-tv-food from other cultures, and many of my peers have, as well. I think it largely depends upon which part of America you come from and what your upbringing has been. And we are less isolated all the time. Some of it comes from access. Can you afford/do you make room for internet, cable tv, netflix, and other things that would link you to a broader world, or can you/do you not? That said, a lot of things are out of our hands; e.g., the local theatres will only play one foreign movie per month at limited showings because "it wouldn't make money", despite the fact that there is a steady interest in foreign cinema here. I suspect that a lot of our access to other cultures happens or does not because of financially founded decisions by the entertainment industry.

オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

I'm probably also the only guy.

Sorry if I offended anyone, I was letting off some steam and trying to let folks know how bad things are getting here. And we are a gun-culture. They have played an important role in our history and almost every person I know has more than one. I have four personally.

But putting them in a bento would be stupid, it might contaminate the food with lead and nitrous-cellulose. Besides that would make it hard to get out in a hurry. If you are being mugged by a guy with a knife, then you want to put 2-3 rounds into his center of mass before he can stab you. Having to get out your lunch would take too long. So I don't think it would be a good idea.

~オタク

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

[giggle]
No, you're far from the only guy.
I own a rifle myself, although I don't have a licence or a gun cabinet so a friend looks after it for me. I inherited it from my Dad, who was into full-bore target shooting in a big way until his eyes gave out.

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Mmm. That's exactly what I mean. All of the Americans I know like foreign films and books and things (mind you, most of them don't live in America so the sample is somewhat skewed). Whoever it is who decides that foreign stuff would be uneconomic must either think no-one would be interested or no-one would understand. If this is not so then they must just decide they don't want to show foreign stuff on principle.

An example is the TV programme "Man About the House", which was a hilarious programme way back when. Some American broadcasting company bought it, but instead of showing the original they totally remade it as "Three's Company" because "an American audience wouldn't understand the original". We got both versions here, and the main differences were the language and that the American one was considerably more slapstick. I can't imagine how anyone could have not understood the original though. As I say, I think it's odd; it puzzles me.

A different sort of example is Flight of the Conchords. They're rather popular in America as far as I can see (ah, an example of NZ culture well known in the USA!), but that popularity seems to have been quite a surprise to the broadcasting types over there. I understand it was considered to be a major gamble, and that was only on cable.

オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

We don't need a liscence for any guns except ones that are full auto and breech-loading artillery, or better. Oh, and anti-tank things, mines, and frag grenades. Those are off limits to those who are unlicensed. You can just go buy guns and ammo at the grocery store, and so long as it isn't regulated where you live, then you can take it home that day. No fuss.

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

I know. I think everyone in the world knows that. America is famous for it.

オタク
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

I wonder why you can't do that there? I don't think I could live in a country where the enforced gun laws are so restrictive. I guess I gotta move to somewhere remote where crazy laws like that can't be enforced. Like Brazil, or Alaska if they ever do secede from the Union.

Oh well, back to food.I just had a chestnut for the first time in my life, and I like 'em. They are a rare delicacy here as most of our native trees were killed by blight over 100 years ago. They are usually very expensive, but the Korean Market we go to had them $2.00 a lb, which is about twice the going rate for sushi rice.

Otaku
Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

I just thought that I didn't even mention my other weapons. My daito katana, my dirk, my two bowie knives, my two machetes, my three-section staff, my rope dart, my Shiruken, my infantry saber, about forty or so folding knives, my kama, my tomahawk, my atl-atl and darts, my staff-sling, my several slings, my spiked bolas, my bow and arrows, my spears, my several daggers, and some other stuff I don't feel like typing all of.

I also was curious how thin this post would be.

Stephanie
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

By the way, it is not always easy to get guns and ammunition in other parts of the country. Here in California we have very few gun stores (just about the only place that you can legally buy guns) and I remember the laws being somewhat restrictive. I can say quite honestly I only known two people who own guns in all my life, for hunting, so the gun culture is very different out here.

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Yes, that's the state laws though. I know that quite a few states have laws where you can't just take a gun away with you from a shop - you have to agree to buy it then the seller does a check on you and you can come back and get it three days later.
Personally I'd rather rely on the electoral system for ridding myself of oppression, and you don't need guns for self defence if the bad guys don't have guns either - which is the case here thank goodness. I can see, however, that in a country like the USA where there are so many guns in the hands of baddies already, it might be a bit of a problem to start having very restrictive gun laws - the bad guys would just take no notice and only the good guys would conform.
Here in New Zealand you can only have a pistol for use at a gun club, and you have to keep it AT the gun club or securely locked away in a safe. No-one except the police is allowed to have one on their person, and even the police only get given them under certain circumstances. Rifles are different - you need a license, but that's not so hard to get, and you need to have a secure cabinet to keep it in, but you are allowed to take it out and shoot deer and pigs and goats and things. As a result of this, whenever someone is killed by a gunshot a)it is nearly always by a rifle of some sort, b) it's usually a hunting accident and c) it makes the national news because it is such a rare occurrence. Of course there is the occasional gun out there in the wrong hands, but very very few of them. And we have more than our fair share of beatings to death and other non-gun-related evil.

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Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

I can vouch for the King Soba brand, they're delicious - we have a huge variety in the Kensington Whole Foods store and also in some larger supermarkets. I'm particularly keen on the brown rice & wakame flavour for soups and the pumpkin, ginger and rice flavour in simple noodle dishes.

Stephanie
Bento-ing from: San Lorenzo › California › USA
Joined: 15 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 4 years 5 weeks ago.
Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

In the area I live I would say that the majority of people who own guns do not own them through legal avenues or they are cops. And honestly I cannot see owning a gun for self defense. My only experience with guns was a number of years ago while I was at work and there was a drive-by right out front. A gun would not have done one bit of good, for me being behind a bunch of glass or for the poor boy they were aiming for on his bicycle, since no one saw it coming.

And quite unfortunately, gun violence does not even make the evening news here. Plus medical personnel sometimes request to be placed at county hospitals so they can get experience dealing with gunshot wounds (GSW) if they intend to enlist since such experience can be valuable in a war zone.

Not all of the Bay Area is plagued with gun violence and I feel that overall it is a very nice place to live, but there are pockets like any other metropolitan area that are worse than others.

bronwyncarlisle
Moderator
Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 19 weeks ago.
Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

Well I know for sure that if I tried to use a gun for self defence I'd end up shooting myself in my panic! I've never even been able to plant a punch on anyone. My tactic is to run away as fast as I can. Not that I've ever actually had to use it.

オタク
Bento-ing from: › North Carolina › USA
Joined: 21 Sep 2009
User offline. Last seen 4 years 18 weeks ago.
Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

It is odd, but it sounds to me like my old home state is in the crapper. Statistically speaking; the more gun laws in an area, the less law abiding citizens carrying, the less law abiding citizens carrying the more crime. Criminals tend to look for prey with no defense who are not paying attention to their surroundings. So openly carrying weapons deters violent crime. The mere thought that you might shoot back scares the hell out of them. But hey, guns aren't the only weapon out there you can use for self defense. I once was almost mugged but just pulling the front of my shirt up to reveal my bowie knife was enough to deter the crime. They turned and ran away. My knife was a little(okay, alot) bigger than theirs. they each had a little folding knife, and mine was about 7"OA. There was another time when I was jumped near my mother's old house in a bad 'hood, One guy pulls out this razor blade and starts this monologue about how evil I am for being a white guy, and how he's going to cut me up etc. All his friends are about 5' away in a loose circle. So the talkative guy walks right up to me and is yelling in my face, and I drew a knife from my belt and poked him in the balls. I didn't hurt him, I just surprised him. A bit. He shut up in a hurry. I told his friends to go away if they didn't want to have a girl for a gang leader. They all ran away, and I told that guy that I'd let him off this time, but that if I ever saw him again, I'd skewer him like a stuck hog. So he dropped the blade, and backed away slowly, and then turned and ran for all he was worth. And I only ever saw him once after that, and he was trying not to be noticed.

clarissa
Bento-ing from: Berlin › Germany
Joined: 6 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 3 years 40 weeks ago.
Re: How do you make old-school soba noodles?

That was also my first thought.... but I guess it would not be true soba noodles anymore with egg added?

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