On the go eating

Aleria
Bento-ing from: Vancouver › British Columbia › Canada
Joined: 20 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 36 weeks ago.

Now, most days I make bento, and have at least an hour to enjoy my lunch. However, on Fridays, I don't get a lunch break. Any food has to be eaten whilst running across my rather large campus.
I've been taking sandwiches, but I'm already getting sick of them (the whole point of bento is not eating sandwiches, darnit!)
So, I'm looking for suggestions on easy to eat on the go food.

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bronwyncarlisle
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Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 18 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Cornish pasties? They're traditionally eaten room (or mine) temp, and I love them. There's no gravy in them as such, so they're not nasty and gluey when they're cold. There are links to recipes at the bottom of that article.

Quiches are nice cold too, although the pastry is maybe a bit too fragile.

I make a chicken filo thing which I bring to work to eat cold. The recipe is at the bottom of here, and the instructions for making it small triangles instead of one big pie are a little further up the page. You could use any similar filling - use some sort of vegetable instead of the chicken for instance. It's really just a cheese sauce with chicken and bacon (which you could swap for broccoli, cooked potatoes, asparagus, etc) and then eggs mixed in which make it set when it's baked. Some sort of thick lentil curry stuff might be nice as a filling too - sort of like a filo samosa.

____________________________________

Bronwyn

My blog is Food and Shoes

Loretta
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Bento-ing from: London › UK
Joined: 4 Mar 2009
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Re: On the go eating

As a change from cornish pasties there are also empanadas (or caribbean patties). Spain has a variety of empanadas but pretty much every South American country has its own kinds.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empanada

I'd also suggest Vietnamese summer rolls
http://justbento.com/forum/fresh-vietnamese-spring-rolls-not-fried

And Gazpacho
http://justbento.com/forum/recipes-avoid-spoilage#comment-7450

If you enjoy risotto and don't mind making more as leftovers for the next day there's arancini
http://www.waitrose.com/recipe/antonio_carluccio%27s_arancini.aspx
(I've never finished arancini in an oven, you can skip that part if you want)

Jiza
Bento-ing from: Madrid › Spain
Joined: 13 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 35 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Good idea on the pasties! I personally prefer them cold.

You could also try empanadas (the spanish/south american version for the pasties): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empanada

While in south America they are called "empanada", in spain they are called "empanadillas" (lit. "little pasties") because our empanada is bigger, so we cut pieces and eat them with our hands.
In south america they have lots of different fillings, while in spain the most common is tuna, tomato and onion.

However i have to correct a thing that wiki article says: spanish empanadillas ARE fried in olive oil while spanish empanada is made in the oven. It's indeed a good thing for bento so here is the recipe:

EMPANADILLAS

For the filling:
- 1 onion, thinly cut
- 1 green pepper (optional)
- 1 can crushed tomato
- cans of tuna (depending on your preferred tuna-sauce ratio, i prefer them to have a little more sauce than tuna but that is to taste!)
- 1 boiled egg, crushed very thinly
- Olive oil

The skins can be home made but it's too much work. We usually get them bought. I guess any will be okay, i think ours are made out of wheat.

1.- Heat a pan with a spoon of olive oil and when it's hot add the onion. Cook until golden. You can also add green pepper very thinly cut if you like it.
2.- In a plate, mix the egg, the tuna and the tomato.
3.- Mix the onion and the mixture and reserve.
4.- Display the skins on a flat surface and add a spoon of the mixture on each. You can glue the skins with some beaten egg but you can just "close" them by carefully folding them and fixing the edges by pressing them with a fork. Now you have a lot of raw empanadillas :)
5.- Heat olive oil in a pan (enough to half-cover the empanadillas). When it's boiling, add the empanadillas to the oil and cook until they are golden and crispy.
6.- Eat and enjoy ^^

***

The empanada is easier to make, and the filling is made by the same procedure. The difference is that you should use Puff-pastry instead of those dumpling skins and you just put it in the oven until done.

EMPANADA:

For the filling: the same as above, BUT do add green pepper. Some people use red pepper too, i just can't eat it.

2 large skins of pastry. You can buy the pastry on a supermarket, my mum does. She uses Nestle, because it's thin. In the north of Spain the liking is to use a thick pasty, I do prefer the thinner one ;)

1.- Prepare the filling as above. Obviously you should make a large bunch of it, as the pastry skins are big.
2.- Preheat the oven. I guess 180ºC should be ok (same temperature as to bake cakes)
2.- Evenly oil an oven tray and put the first skin of pastry on top of it. Don't worry if it's larger than the tray, just make sure you "adjust" the pastry to the baking surface.
3.- Put the filling on top of the skin. Spread it evenly over all the surface, leaving a frame of 1-2 cm near the borders.
4.- Put the other skin on top. This one and the one underneath sould "close". Just make little rolls with them on the borders so they won't tear apart. They will be the crunchiest part of the empanada ^^
5.- Optional: with a beaten egg, paint the surface of the empanada so it has a shiny look when it's done ^^
6.- Bake until golden brown. It's preferred the darker the pastry gets so if you're not sure when to stop, do it when the borders start to get bruned.

You can cut pieces of this and put them in a bento, and it's delicious either cold or hot (i prefer it cold, though) :)
This one is easier to cook than the empanadillas and it's not as oily. AND it stays in the fridge for several days ^^

____________________________________

My bento blog: http://justbento.com/blog/1305
My art blog: http://jizaacaso.deviantart.com

Loretta
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Bento-ing from: London › UK
Joined: 4 Mar 2009
User offline. Last seen 51 weeks 4 days ago.
Re: On the go eating
Jiza wrote:

However i have to correct a thing that wiki article says: spanish empanadillas ARE fried in olive oil while spanish empanada is made in the oven.

Ouch! A bit of an over generalisation here, empanadillas are made in the oven as well as being fried - both methods are used. And there's no definitive way to describe the individual sized empanadas, generally they are called empanadillas, but not always.

Here are some photos of empanadillas from a good pastry store in Alicante
http://www.pastelerialamurciana.es/productos.php?idfamilia=4
All are baked (can't make them myself as I don't have an oven, and I'm not so enamoured of the fried kind)

I can't wait until Christmas when I'll be able gorge myself again.

maki
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Bento-ing from: somewhere › France
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Re: On the go eating

How about onigiri? Very portable.

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Jiza
Bento-ing from: Madrid › Spain
Joined: 13 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 35 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Another one! Man I'm hungry.

CROQUETAS
these are the typical "grandma's recipe". They are not very difficult to make but the trick is to leave the bechamel for 1 day in the fridge. You'll need:

- Bechamel (this is a paste made out of milk and flour, salt and nutmeg. For this dish, you should make it very thick so it's preferred not to buy it made).
- Chicken leftovers, or spanish ham, or whatever you want. The preferred thing is usually chicken and ham. They should be VERY THINLY cut.
- Bread crumbs
- 1 Egg, beaten
- olive oil (what else? xD)

1.- Prepare the bechamel by slowly roasting the flour and slowly adding milk. Be careful to evenly, slowly, lovingly toss the thing so the flour completely dissolves. I think Maki posted some recipes for this in justhungry. You can also add some salt and nutmeg, to taste.
2.- You can add the chicken and/or spanish ham in the process of preparing the bechamel, but you can mix it with the bechamel when you finish cooking it, in a dish.
3.- When everything is mixed, allow it to completely cool down and put the mixture in a dish (covered with plastic wrap if you want, i cover it with another dish ^^) and leave it in the fridge for ONE DAY. 24 hours. No kidding!!! This will make the mixture to thicken a lot. The thicker and firmer it gets, the better! You can leave it outside too, but if you have a cat, I'd recommend to put it inside a cupboard or something xD
4.- The next day (if the mixture survived... i'll explain this later), beat the egg and put it in a dish. Put the bread crumbs in another dish and take the mixture out of the fridge.
5.- Pick up a tablespoon of the mixture. It will be very sticky in the inside, so with 2 spoons give it shape of a flat meatball. Drop it in the beaten egg, take it out, drop it in the bread crumbs and set aside in a dish. Repeat the process until you are out of bechamel. Now you have raw croquetas. ATTENTION: YOU CAN FREEZE THEM when in this phase and fry them any other day.
6.- In a pan, heat enough olive oil to half-cover the croquetas. fry them untill crispy-brown, then place them in kitchen draining paper. Done ^^

You can eat them pipping hot or cold. I DO prefer them cold. And you can totally eat them with your hands.

About what i said on phase 3 of the mixture surviving the day in the fridge. My mum had to cook double mixture quantity than really needed because i usually went to the fridge during the day to eat a pinch of bechamel with my fingers. And my brother too. And my mum!!!

google search on croquetas: http://images.google.es/images?hl=es&source=hp&q=croquetas&um=1&ie=UTF-8...

The cool thing about croquetas is that you can freeze them (but on the stage before frying them!!!) and fry a couple of them to put inside your bento. Awww it's been ages since i don't eat them... >_<

Jiza
Bento-ing from: Madrid › Spain
Joined: 13 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 35 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

oops! sorry! *n_n* I never saw empanadillas made in the oven! o_o
I saw them made at the baker but not at home O_o

Stephanie
Bento-ing from: San Lorenzo › California › USA
Joined: 15 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 4 years 5 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Onigiri worked out very well for me when I had to eat on the run. I usually had onigiri, a boiled egg and some chopped vegetables I could eat with my hands.

another_amanda
Bento-ing from: › USA
Joined: 12 Aug 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 43 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Anything that can be wrapped in a tortilla would be good on the go. Sandwich-type things or fajitas are the first thing that come to mind, but if the tortilla is plain, then you could probably use just about anything that's not too juicy. For more space, overlap two tortillas. If you're not concerned with trash, then you could wrap the whole thing in foil and peel it like a banana as you eat (there's gotta be an eco-friendly way to do this. Or, recycle the foil).

You could take this same approach with pitas. It's amazing how many non-sandwich things taste good in a pocket of bread. ^^
You could also fill a travel mug with soup.

I agree 100% with the cornish pasties, and thanks to Sweeney Todd, there are dozens of meat pie recipes available on the interwebs.

bronwyncarlisle
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Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 18 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Is that right about Sweeney Todd? How bizarre. Meat pies (just called "a pie") are the original fast food in New Zealand and Australia, we eat enormous numbers of them and you can buy them pretty much everywhere. The number of times I've gone "down to the pub for a pie and a pint"! When we are away from home we miss meat pies, decent milk, Vegemite (not me though), Peanut Slabs and a couple of other things the most. We even have an annual best pie competition.

Does this mean that we are maybe going to be able to find [meat] pies in America soon?

Jiza
Bento-ing from: Madrid › Spain
Joined: 13 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 35 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

I recall seeing meatpie recipes from americans on the internet o_o

Aleria
Bento-ing from: Vancouver › British Columbia › Canada
Joined: 20 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 36 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Haha, thanks for all the ideas! I already knew how to make most of that stuff, but I've been a bit braindead lately. University takes a lot out of a person.
Now I can't wait until I get to go grocery shopping.

Stephanie
Bento-ing from: San Lorenzo › California › USA
Joined: 15 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 4 years 5 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Not that I am at all the one to ask about American meat recipes... But my mother makes pot pies with a gooey meat and vegetable filling and my husband sometimes buys them in the frozen section. Plus we being American, we also have different cultures meat pies like empanadas and piroshki that are readily available.

bronwyncarlisle
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Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
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Re: On the go eating

Yes, I like those things too - but they're not the same as a lovely flaky pastry crust filled with a savoury stew!
This should give some idea of the reverence with which the things are regarded here.
Not that I actually eat pies very often these days. They're way too fattening.

Stephanie
Bento-ing from: San Lorenzo › California › USA
Joined: 15 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 4 years 5 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Like I said, so not the expert on meat related things I have been veggie nearly half my life. But if I recall correctly in chicken pot pie there is a pastry crust and what you call stew (and what I call "gooey vegetable and meat stuff") much like this: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Chicken-Pot-Pie-IX/Detail.aspx

bronwyncarlisle
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Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 18 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

Yep, that looks pretty much like a pie. You just need to miniaturise it (to about 4x3") and it needs to be taken out of its pie dish and put in a paper bag and sold in petrol stations and dairies (convenience stores, I think you call them).

I think of a pot-pie as having a crust only on the top - but that's just what I've always assumed from books. We don't call anything "pot-pie".

Yllsa
Bento-ing from: Binghamton › New York › USA
Joined: 4 Oct 2009
User offline. Last seen 4 years 13 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

The fun part about Cornish Pasties is that you can actually put several different kinds of filling in them. Traditionally the entire pastie was meant to be a whole meal, so you'd have your "dinner" filling of meat and veg as 2/3 of it, and then you might have some apple or other fruit in the remaining 1/3. Sort of like an edible bento :D
~*~
hana.yori.dango

another_amanda
Bento-ing from: › USA
Joined: 12 Aug 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 43 weeks ago.
meat pies

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thF1ryaj3dE

On the topic of meat pies and Sweeney Todd, a friend just sent this to me. Good Eats meets Sweeney Todd.
<3 Alton Brown.

bronwyncarlisle
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Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 18 weeks ago.
Re: On the go eating

A big one of these oyaki would be good too.

bronwyncarlisle
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Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 18 weeks ago.
Re: meat pies

That's hilarious. Not quite how I'd make a shepherd's pie though, it's sort of traditional to use left-over roast lamb/hogget/mutton mixed with the left-over gravy, and onions and tomato sauce. It's the only thing I keep tomato sauce (ketchup) for - I've been known to roast a leg of sheep just so I can make shepherd's pie.

Stephanie
Bento-ing from: San Lorenzo › California › USA
Joined: 15 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 4 years 5 weeks ago.
Re: meat pies

Alton Brown really gets on my nerves and his way of cooking really doesn't mesh with my own. But I do love Shepard's Pie. I just made a vegan version last week and it was so much better than I remember my mother's when I was growing up, not to mention way healthier. Even my picky meat eating husband liked it.

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